EDX3270 Annotations

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Annotation Six: Literacy Teaching uses the Write Stuff

Filed under: Uncategorized — sarahpeterson at 9:54 am on Friday, April 1, 2011

Reference: Manger, N. & Simos, M. (2011). Literacy Teaching uses the Write Stuff. Retrieved March 16, 2011, from http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/in-depth/literacy-teaching-uses-the-write-stuff/story-e6frebvu-1226014082498  

Annotation:

According to associate professor Susan Hill (cited in Simos, 2011) the ‘close connection’ between reading and writing needs to be explored more. This is because some children don’t always learn to read before they write (Simos, 2011). The importance of having good teachers ensures that children explore and engage their creativity when writing creatively. Through making creative writing experiences fun and engaging children are more like to be engaged and enjoy what is taught (Simos, 2011).

Reflection:

Having good teachers allows students to unleash their creatively through story writing.  Many children struggle to write creatively according to Bradley, 2001. Through teachers encouraging students to become confident capable learners will inspire creativity and writing skills (Bradley, 2001). Thinking of interesting ways of creating stories including: games, re-writing or re-telling the end of a book as well as selecting inspirations which interest the children are essential to fuelling this creativity.

Annotation Three: Working Mums Losing Quality Time

Filed under: Uncategorized — sarahpeterson at 9:32 am on Friday, April 1, 2011

Reference: Doherty, E. (2011). Working Mums Losing Quality Time. Retrieved March 30, 2011, from http://www.couriermail.com.au/ipad/working-mums-losing-quality-time/story-fn6ck8la-1226029607396  

Annotation:

According to a new survey Australian working mothers are only spending 15 hours per week with their child (Doherty, 2011). In addition to this fathers are spending half that amount of time. Family psychologist Dr Janet Hall (Cited in Doherty, 2011) said children did thrive when supervised by their own parent – whether it was mum or dad. “The (15 hours) sounds worthy so long as it is quality time – the best interaction is reading or telling stories, walks to the park, singing or doing art, helping with house chores,” (Doherty, 2011).

Reflection:

Parental involvement with their child’s learning ensures that they are able to note development and engage the child with learning experiences at home. With time being limited ensuring that parents have the information about their child and their schooling that they require is sometimes difficult. With the use of school websites showing details of planning, homework and important dates ensures that they are kept in the loop. Cogdon (2009) believes that this is an essential tool to help involve busy parents in their child’s learning.

Annotation Two: Schools’ Web Tangle

Filed under: Uncategorized — sarahpeterson at 9:19 am on Friday, April 1, 2011

Reference: Cogdon, k. (2009) Schools’ Web Tangle. Retrieved March 22, 2011, from http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/learn/schools-web-tangle/story-e6frf7nf-1225806003509

Annotation:

The incorporation and better use of school websites will assist in bridging the gap between home and school according to Cogdon (2009). Additionally he believes that many school websites are too complicated for the average parent. Cogdon states many parents are pushing for fast paced information via websites and emails as they are leading busy lives and simple have little time to keep informed (Cogdon, 2009).

Reflection:

The importance of parents being involved in their children’s schooling and education is one of great significance. Many professionals as well as studies and articles have shown the importance of this including: Buckler, 2010, Hurst, 2010 and the New South Wales Government: Department of Education, Science and Training, 2009. Conclusive studies show that children have better developed language, literacy, reading and numeracy skills when parents engage them with learning within the home in addition to school (Kennedy, 2004).

Annotation Ten: Supporting your Child in Early Childhood: Literacy and Numeracy Fact Sheet.

Filed under: Uncategorized — sarahpeterson at 8:36 am on Friday, April 1, 2011

Reference: Office for Early Childhood Education and Care. (N.D). Supporting your Child in Early Childhood: Literacy and Numeracy Fact Sheet. Retrieved March 22, 2011, from http://education.qld.gov.au/literacyandnumeracy/pdf/factsheet-activitysheet-early.pdf  

Annotation:

Parents play an important role as they build the foundation for the child’s needs to develop literacy and numeracy skills (office for early childhood education and care, N.D). Children learn through play and it is important that parents provide children with fun activities. The office for early childhood education and care (N.D) provide a range of different activities and strategies to promote literacy and numeracy skill learning.

Reflection:

There is wide spread information and findings which show parental involvement in their child’s education greatly improves their interest, knowledge and love of school and literacy. According to Buckler (2010) children will develop a love for reading and have stronger literacy skills simply by being read to at home. Additionally this view is shared by well noted children’s author Mem Fox (cited in Buckler, 2010) who believes that illiteracy could be wipe out in the next generation simple by parents engaging their children in reading.

Annotation Nine: The Role of Literacy in Early Childhood Education

Filed under: Uncategorized — sarahpeterson at 8:29 am on Friday, April 1, 2011

Reference: The Reading Teacher. (2004). The Role of Literacy in Early Childhood Education. Retrieved March 16, 2011, from http://www.accessmylibrary.com/article-1G1-122621651/role-literacy-early-childhood.html

Annotation:

The importance of parental involvement in their child’s learning and development is essential. This involvement is an integral part of planning for early childhood classroom (The Reading Teacher, 2004). If the link between supportive parental involvement and children’s literacy development is well established children’s learning will thrive. Additionally parents who model the use of literacy in the home and engage children in activities that promote understanding about literacy will promote a love for learning.

 

Reflection:

Encouraging parents to engage with their children in literacy experiences at home as well as become involved in school literacy programs such as home readers they become actively involved. This involvement in their children’s literacy development and school is something many people believe is important (Hurst, 2010). Additionally children thrive of the support of their parents in their learning (Giles, 2010).

Annotation Eight: Checkpoint Test for Early Intervention in Student Literacy

Filed under: Uncategorized — sarahpeterson at 8:29 am on Friday, April 1, 2011

Reference: Hennessy, C. (2010). Checkpoint Test for Early Intervention in Student Literacy. Retrieved March 22, 2011, from http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/checkpoint-test-for-early-intervention-in-student-literacy/story-e6freoof-1225875837225  

Annotation:

Implementing a year one checkpoint test would be a fresh approach to early intervention of literacy and numeracy skills (Hennessy, 2010). Education minister Geoff Wilson stated that the incorporation of the testing three times per year (February, June and October) would identify the students who need learning support. Additionally the early detection allows for students to get the support which they require. Hennessy (2010) also mentions that this early detection ensures that the ‘at risk’ children have a higher success rate when detected early.

Reflection:

The implementation of an early detection checkpoint test would identify the children which need extra support to optimise their success in literacy and numeracy. NET testing which is completed in year two is often considered late in the detection of literacy and numeracy issues (Commonwealth Department of Education, Science and Training, 2001). The implementation of the checkpoint test and other government initiatives including ‘books for bubs’ and ‘reduced costs of children’s book’ increases the accessibility of quality literacy experiences (Giles, 2010).

Annotation Seven: Program to Boost Literacy

Filed under: Uncategorized — sarahpeterson at 8:27 am on Friday, April 1, 2011

Reference: Giles, D. (2010). Program to Boost Literacy. Retrieved March 16, 2011, from http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/program-to-boost-literacy/story-e6freoof-1225835084608

Annotation:

According to Giles (2010) only 6 out of ten Queensland children and 8 out of ten children nationally are read to within the home. National newspapers such as The Courier Mail have joined forces with bookstores to offer reduced prices on children’s book to promote reading. Additionally the government will introduce a free book for all Queensland babies born after July 1st 2010. This is the bid to promote reading at home from a young age.   

Reflection:

The promotion of reading at home is one which most if not all teachers believe is essential to the development of a child. Reading to children from a young age promotes a love for reading, an interest in literacy and develops language and reading skills (Hurst, 2010).  Well noted children’s author Mem Fox (cited in Buckler, 2010) believes Illiteracy within one generation could probably be simply by parents and carers of children reading them three books a day.

Annotation Five: Who am I, if not Sam.

Filed under: Uncategorized — sarahpeterson at 8:26 am on Friday, April 1, 2011

Reference: Vonhoff, R. (2011). Who am I, if not Sam. Retrieved March 23, 2011, from http://www.couriermail.com.au/ipad/rebecca-vonhoff-who-i-am-if-not-sam/story-fn6ck8la-1226021117548

Annotation:

Children’s authors leave an indelible mark on our psyche that can guide our path through life. Isn’t it time they got some credit? (Vonhoff, 2011).  Through reading to children it inspires their imagination and creativity. Vonhoff (2011) believes that this exposure to children’s books sparks their interest in particular carers, for example green eggs and ham may have been the start of a love for food and cooking for an aspiring chef. Parents give little thought to the words that are being read however many of us can think back to a memory of a Mem Fox, Dr Seuss or Roald Dahl story.

Reflection:

Vonhoff’s views on the impacts of children’s books on the lives and views of the child is one which many people believe. Vast amounts of information can be found on the importance of children’s literature and its impact. Kennedy (2004) believes reading to children from a young age increases their knowledge of the world. This knowledge and understanding allows children to make informed decisions as well as have informed views of the world and the elements within it.

Annotation Four: Smarter Games, Dumber Children

Filed under: Uncategorized — sarahpeterson at 8:25 am on Friday, April 1, 2011

Reference: Poulter, S. (2008, Jan 11). Smarter games, dumber children. The Courier-Mail, 12.

Annotation: Poulter (2008, Jan 11), in his article ‘Smarter games, dumber children’, outlined the negative effects of computer games on the new generation of children. The increasing access to computer games, amongst children limits their attention spans, harms their ability to learn and promotes a ‘flight or fight’ instinct. Poulter advises that computer games should not be introduced to children below the age of seven as this allows for their brain to develop normally. A 300 product trial on allegedly educational toys discovered that only two products of these had proven learning techniques.

Reflection: Many parents and educators are advised to include educational technologies and technological application into the learning environment which was outlined in the National Australian Curriculum set to be implemented in 2012 (Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, 2009). This information in comparison to that given by Poulter (2008, Jan 11), makes the decision to include these programs particularly difficult.  As educators we are advised that ICT programs should be included in to learning experiences through document such as Essential Learnings (Queensland Studies Authority, 2007) and  Early Years Curriculum Guidelines (Queensland Government, 2006). However upon reading articles such as this, many educators may become hesitant to use them in their classrooms and learning experiences.

Annotation One: The Importance of Reading Aloud to Children

Filed under: Uncategorized — sarahpeterson at 8:11 am on Friday, April 1, 2011

Reference: Buckler, T. (2010). The Importance of Reading Aloud to Children. Retrieved March 22, 2011, from http://www.childcarelounge.com/parent-articles/reading-aloud.php

Annotation: According to Buckler (2010) the importance of reading aloud to children is that it assists their cognitive and social development a view which is shared by children’s author Mem Fox (cited in Buckler, 2010). Additionally through reading aloud to children it assists their brain development, speech skills and bonding with the child. Fox (2010) believes Illiteracy within one generation could probably be simply by parents and carers of children reading them three books a day. This view is shared by many early childhood educators as it develops a love and interest in reading.  

Reflection: Immersing children into literacy and reading should be something which is practiced both at school and continued within the child’s home (Hurst, 2010).  This continuity between the home and school life of a child ensures that they have a maximum level of exposure and immersion to literacy experiences and resources.  Additionally reading to children is fun and is one of the best ways of preparing them for formal schooling (NSW Government: Department of Education and Training, 2009).